Bradford Condon PhD

Bioinformatics, Web & Mobile Development


news
When I taught a science for non-science majors at Cornell University, my favorite lecture was on science in the popular media. My learning objective was straight forward: I wanted students to pick up a newspaper, flip to the science section, and detect bullshit. This is such an important life skill because at this point in time, blogs, newspapers, and magazines print unscientific bullshit. They do it because it sells. I have never seen an article so neatly package all of the problems that lead to this state of affairs than John Bohannon's recent "Chocolate Diet" charade. Read the full post...

Well, the BBC and The New York Times have both published pieces on the Russian hackers “CyberVor”.  The claim is that  1.2 billion user names and passwords from some 420,000 websites have been hacked.  The sites/users affected, nature of the vulnerability, and severity of the threat have not been disclosed.

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In the past, I’ve written about the importance of setting up custom newsfeeds for current publications in your field, and using Citeulike to share references.  While these tools can be useful for discovering and archiving content, they are not ideal for sharing and disseminating it.  Gathering content and distilling it for others is an art: the art of content curation.

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An article posted on the Scientific American blog caught my attention recently.  Researchers have discovered the existence of a new organelle, the tannosome, in plants.  It is this organelle that produces tannins, of great interest to wine lovers.  The scientific article in question, posted to my scoop.it, was officially published in the Annals of Botany on September 25th 2013, but it barely created a ripple in the news cycle.  Why not?

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